Bigfoot Sign in Sign Post Forest

Bigfoot is now proudly represented in Watson Lake, Yukon Territory (YT)’s Sign Post Forest. The landmark is located at Kilometer 980 of the Alaska Highway and has collected over 77,000 signs form around the world. The Sign Post Forest originated in 1942, when recovering U.S. soldier Carl K. Lindley was repairing the directional signs on the highway and decided to add one pointing to his hometown of Danville, Illinois. Since then, visitors from all over the world have brought signs that are significant to them to add to the forest, including our own Ralf Notheis.

When he’s not running Bigfoot’s Crane and Hoist Academy, Ralf is a motorcycle enthusiast. He’s done several solo long-distance trips, and last summer took his longest trip to date yet Tuktoyaktuk, YT, clocking in at about 10,000km. He brought one of Bigfoot’s signs with him to hang in the Sign Post Forest, so we sat down with him to hear more about his trip and what taking a Bigfoot sign means to him.

Ralf Notheis at Arctic Circle

Bigfoot’s Ralf Notheis in the Arctic Circle

  1. How long was the entire trip?
    I was gone for 13 days. The first few days I was riding pretty hard because I just wanted to get up to the Yukon, and then really take my time from there.
  2. What were the unique challenges of this trip? What made it interesting?
    The weather and the clay roads were definitely a challenge.  From Dawson City to Tuktoyaktuk is 1,000km of loose gravel and clay; it’s like riding on grease and many people on 2 wheels end up getting flown out from bad crashes. The Robert Campbell Highway from Watson Lake was also really challenging, and a lot of people told me not to do it. There’s only one place to fuel up on that road, but I had just enough gas to get to that station, fuel up, and keep going.I left equipped with a sensible plan and great gear that includes my BMW motorcycle. I was happy to finally drink the Sourtoe Cocktail in Dawson City, along with riding the Dempster Hwy to the Arctic Ocean, it’s been on my to-do list for a long time. If you don’t know what the Sourtoe Cocktail is, click here to learn about this true Candian tradition.

    Drinking the Sour Toe Cocktail in Dawson City

  3. Biking is a big passion of yours. How many trips like this have you taken by yourself?
    Tuktoyaktuk was for sure the longest one but I’ve been all over BC, Alberta and through the Western United States. I plan to be in Ushuaia, Argentina in 2023 for my 50th Birthday and ride home from there.
  4. How did you find out about the Sign Post Forest?
    I was researching the places I had planned on camping and stumbled across the story about it. Watson Lake, YT is not famous for too many things but the history of this landmark is pretty amazing.
  5. What made you want to put a sign up there?
    I think it’s great advertising since thousands of people visit this site annually from all over the world and I didn’t see even one other sign from a competitor.

    Ralf’s BMW bike with the Bigfoot sign safely packed

  6. Tell me about the sign you put up there. How big was it?
    It had about an 18 inch diameter and I was able to wrap it and tuck it between my luggage.  We’ve had this sign laying in the operations office since I started in 2015 so it was finally put to good use. I got there at night and camped nearby so I just walked over with the sign. It took me almost an hour to find a good spot for it but I’m really happy with where it is, I think it looks really cool.
  7. Why did you decide to take one of Bigfoot’s signs up there and not one from your hometown or an old motorcycle plate?
    The Bigfoot logo is way cooler and more personal to me than any other sign I can think of. Sure, I could have taken any other random sign up with me, but the Bigfoot branding just looks so cool! My only concern is that it’s so nice that someone will steal it!
Ralf Notheis in Tuktoyaktuk, YT

Ralf at his destination: Tuktoyaktuk, YT

The tenacity and dedication that Ralf needed to complete this trip to the Arctic Circle are the same values that drive Bigfoot’s Crane and Hoist Academy and have earned it awards across North America. Click here to discover how combining industry-leading practices with lived-out values make our academy the premier choice for crane and hoist operation training.

We are a young company on the move, grow along with us

We offer competitive compensation

  • Excellent Benefits Package
  • 100% MSP coverage
  • We believe in continual professional development for our team members

Why Bigfoot Crane Company?

What we’re looking for:

At Bigfoot, we believe our success begins with the team we build. As a small, diverse, non-union company, we need agile team members keen to grow and work in various aspects of our service business. Continued education and development are a core belief, and we proactively support our crew to reach new heights – literally and figuratively. Our business includes sales, rentals and service for Self-Erecting Tower Cranes, Traditional Tower Cranes, Construction Hoists and Derrick Cranes.

We are a “pitch in” and roll up your sleeves kind of place, cultivating a strong team environment. We actively promote a culture high in honesty and integrity. Legendary Service: It’s what we do.

To apply for this position, please use the form to submit your cover letter and resume. If the form is not behaving please email us at: HR@BIGFOOTCRANE.COM
(emphasis on the cover letter, we want to get to know you!)

Where do you see your career going? Why not enjoy a career with a view….150 feet up!

But only the best can handle this work – is that you?

Ever drive past tower cranes and think “Wow” … or wonder how they work? If you love getting your
hands-on machinery, learning what makes them ‘tick’… and are the person who can fix almost anything –
then we want to talk to you!

Join Bigfoot Crane Company and be part of the fastest growing Crane company in Western Canada!

Crane service BC

CRANE TECHNICIAN (MECHANIC) @ BIGFOOT CRANE

You will have the opportunity to work as a member of our Legendary Crane Service team. Part of the secret sauce of our success is the quality of our service, and you would be an important part of that. We can offer you a position which will challenge you and continue to grow your professional skills. We won’t lie, the work is hard and sometimes it can be long days but if you’re the kind of person who likes to push themselves to be ahead of the rest – then you have what it takes to be Legendary!

Someone with a heavy-duty mechanical background, relevant experience working on machinery – no certifications necessary but a passion for mechanics is a must. Huge bonus if you’ve already worked with Tower Cranes, but previous experience not required.

  • Welding or fabrication skills would be fantastic
  • Experience with pulley systems is definitely helpful
  • If you’ve got some electrical knowledge, along with some hydraulics – that is another bonus
  • Great communication skills with the team and site colleagues
  • A positive attitude, team spirit, and be able to work closely with our Crane Service team
  • A positive ambassador for our brand on job sites
  • An ability to remotely assist Client’s on how to trouble-shoot equipment based on standard operating procedures and technical manuals
  • An ability to work overtime, sometimes critical jobs require our team to stick with it longer than usual
  • Someone who can climb ladders, and comfortable working at heights up to 150 feet in all safe weather conditions
  • A candidate with a valid driver’s license and own transportation as some sites aren’t accessible with public transport
  • A keen problem-solving ability to diagnose and trouble-shoot mechanical and electronic issues
  • Attention to detail, someone who can record the repair story on work orders, noting problems or unusual situations encountered during repairs
  • Dedication to safety, by participating in the Bigfoot Crane Safety Program including safety meetings and worksite inspections.
  • Someone who takes pride in their work, keeping their tools, equipment and work area clean and functional
  • Bonus if you have a current passport allowing entry into the USA, some travel required
  • For the right candidate, we’ll put you through our Crane Operator program
  • We promote and protect our awesome culture

We are a young company on the move, grow along with us

We offer competitive compensation

  • Excellent Benefits Package
  • 100% MSP coverage
  • We believe in continual professional development for our team members

Why Bigfoot Crane Company?

What we’re looking for:

At Bigfoot, we believe our success begins with the team we build. As a small, diverse, non-union company, we need agile team members keen to grow and work in various aspects of our service business. Continued education and development are a core belief, and we proactively support our crew to reach new heights – literally and figuratively. Our business includes sales, rentals and service for Self-Erecting Tower Cranes, Traditional Tower Cranes, Construction Hoists and Derrick Cranes.

We are a “pitch in” and roll up your sleeves kind of place, cultivating a strong team environment. We actively promote a culture high in honesty and integrity. Legendary Service: It’s what we do.

To apply for this position, please use the form to submit your cover letter and resume. If the form is not behaving please email us at: HR@BIGFOOTCRANE.COM
(emphasis on the cover letter, we want to get to know you!)

Where do you see your career going? Why not enjoy a career with a view….150 feet up!

But only the best can handle this work – is that you?

Ever drive past tower cranes and think “Wow” … or wonder how they work? If you love getting your hands-on machinery, learning what makes them ‘tick’… and are the person who can fix almost anything –then we want to talk to you!

Join Bigfoot Crane Company and be part of the fastest growing Crane company in Western Canada!

Top Takeaway: Working at height in the winter can be dangerous, but you can reduce the risks by planning ahead, dressing appropriately, and monitoring yourself and others for signs of cold
stress.

Winter is the most challenging season for any outdoor job-site, but cold weather and blowing snow can make working at height even more hazardous. Follow these best practices to stay safe
this winter, no matter the height or temperature.

  1. Clear snow and ice.
    Falling is always the most obvious risk of working at height, but ice and snow make it an even greater hazard. Black ice, whether caused by fluctuating temperatures or frozen
    condensation, is a common problem but is often hard to spot. Similarly, snow can melt and refreeze or compact over time, making it difficult to remove and easy to slip on.
    Make sure to shovel and de-ice regularly to prevent falls or painful slips.
  2. Pay attention to the weather.
    Storms can rise quickly in the winter, reducing visibility to white-out conditions and blowing any unsecured objects (or people) over edges. Check the weather in advance
    and make sure your site has all necessary controls put in place, but don’t let your guard down if there’s a clear forecast. Pay attention to the weather throughout the day to give
    your workers plenty of time to get to safety before a storm, and ensure workers wear high-visibility equipment so they are easy to spot if rescue is needed.
  3. Prepare for wind.
    Even without blowing snow, wind presents a serious challenge at height. Faster winds caused by higher altitude can accelerate cold stress and must be carefully worked
    around. Keep any loose materials securely fastened when not in use and provide protected areas where workers can regularly step out of the wind to warm up. Monitor
    wind readings on the ground and at height to ensure no equipment is damaged and everyone stays safe.
  4. Avoid cold stress.
    Cold stress occurs when the body cools down faster than it can warm up. It can cause disorientation, numbness, frostbite, and hypothermia, and worsens quickly once it sets
    in. It is especially dangerous to people working at height as it could be hard to get back to the ground for treatment if it progresses too far. Ensure everyone on site knows the
    signs of cold stress and how to immediately treat them. Consult your local work safety board for more information on cold stress and its symptoms.
  5. Dress for the weather.
    Your clothes are your first level of defense against winter hazards. Dress in layers to create adjustable insulation against the cold and wind, making sure to wear a
    waterproof top layer. If any of your clothes soak through, change into something dry as soon as possible. To prevent slipping on icy rungs or platforms, wear high-traction boots
    and gloves that fit tightly without cutting off circulation.
  6. Protect your PPE.
    If your fall equipment freezes and thaws repeatedly, the material can stiffen or rot, weakening it and put the user at risk. Likewise, drying it with an electric dryer or heater
    can stiffen or melt the material. Store your PPE properly in a cool area where it can dry completely without the risk of freezing, and always check your equipment before using
    it for damage or weakness.
  7. Inspect your station.
    Winter weather and temperatures can be hard on structures and equipment, so always check over the area you will be working on before starting for the day. This is especially
    crucial if you will be working on a platform, lift, or scaffolding for the day, as there is less room to maneuver if something weakens or snaps.
  8. Plan for rescues.
    Winter weather throws extra challenges into completing emergency rescues. Uncleared snow, ice, and low visibility can make a straightforward rescue plan nearly impossible,
    so it is imperative that you have more than one plan in place. Brainstorm a list of winter hazards that could impede rescues and make multiple plans to account for every area.
    It’s a lot of work upfront, but it will pay off in the long run if the worst should happen.
  9. Work in pairs.
    If cold stress sets in, disorientation and numbness can make it difficult to recognize the need to stop working and get treatment. Even if a person is aware of what is happening,
    they may ignore warning signs of illness to finish what they’re working on. Work in pairs to monitor each other’s conditions and to ensure that if cold stress does occur it is
    treated immediately.
  10. Train your crew.
    It isn’t enough for management and supervisors to be aware of winter hazards; everyone on site needs to be prepared for what winter will bring to the jobsite. Train
    your crew to identify and deal with hazards, cold stress symptoms, and emergency protocols to ensure that everyone will be safe this winter.
Working at Height Summer

Top Takeaway: Heat stress and the risk of falling are both serious hazards when working at height in the summer. Combined they can be deadly, so stay cool and plan ahead to keep everyone safe this season.

 

Summer is synonymous with construction. Its consistent weather and sunny days make working outside significantly easier and safer than harsher seasons. The heat, however, is not always your friend.

 

Heat stress is a major problem on jobsites throughout the warmer months and can complicate already hazardous jobs, such as working at height. Here are five rules that must be followed if your site involves working at height this summer.

 

1. Watch the weather.

Summer weather is typically reliable. It’s hot, maybe humid, and has significantly less precipitation to worry about. While this reduces the risk of slipping, summer brings its own hazards, like heat stress and lightning storms. Keep an eye on the weather and make sure your site is prepared for anything the season can throw at you.

 

2. Cover up.

Heat stress occurs when your body warms up faster than it can cool down. Although it feels nice to lose the layers, exposing your skin to the sunlight increases the rate at which your body heats up. Instead of going sleeveless, wear light, loose clothing with long sleeves and legs, UV-blocking sunglasses, and sunscreen to protect yourself from the worst of the sun’s rays.

 

3. Stay hydrated.

Staying hydrated is the most important factor in preventing heat-related illness. Keep a water bottle close at hand throughout the day, refilling it every time you empty it. Drinking water will cool you down and keep you alert, and refilling your bottle will give you regular opportunities to step out of the sun.

 

4. Use appropriate fall protection and prevention.

Drier weather reduces the likelihood of slipping, but it’s still crucial to utilize the appropriate fall prevention and protection equipment for the height you’re at (WorkSafeBC has a simple guide here). Take time to lay out a fall prevention and rescue plan, making sure everyone on site is familiar with it. When you’re not wearing your PPE, store it in a cool, dry place to prevent any damage from the sun or heat.

 

5. Don’t wait to get help.

Getting dizzy or passing out while still at height could put yourself and others in extreme danger as they try to rescue you. Heatstroke can progress quickly, so if you start to feel symptoms such as a headache, dizziness, or you’ve stopped sweating, get back to the ground as quickly and safely as possible to get treatment.

 

Worried about how heat stress will affect your jobsite? Learn more about what it is and how to prevent it in our Summer Jobsite Safety article.

Self Dumping Bins

Self Dumping Bins save workers from harm, while improving job-site productivity. Check out this video to learn how.

Heat Stress

Top Takeaway:

High temperatures are the greatest challenge for jobsites in the summer. Make sure everyone on site is hydrated, eating well, and taking time to cool down to prevent heat stress.

 

Summer is here, and with it comes long days and hot weather. Warmer temperatures can be exciting but are also hazardous for those who work outside or in the heat. Heat stress is a serious threat on a jobsite, so check out these best practices to stay safe this season.

 

1. Have a plan.

The best way to keep your jobsite running safely and smoothly this summer is to be prepared. Consider supplying additional cooling PPE for your crew, such as fans or cold packs, and organize working hours to avoid the hottest part of the day.

2. Stay hydrated and wear sunscreen.

These are the two simplest ways to avoid heat illnesses and protect your health in the long term. Drink enough water (most doctors recommend eight glasses a day) and continuously apply sunscreen to protect yourself from the heat and UV radiation.

3. Respect the sun, love the shade.

Exposure to sunlight is inevitable in the summer, but it should be avoided when possible. Create shaded areas with good air-flow to prevent sunburn and heat-related illnesses.

4. Dress right.

Sleeveless may seem the way to go on a burning day, but exposed skin means a higher risk of sunburn and sunstroke, and could even lead to skin cancer in the long term. Instead of losing layers, wear loose-fitting clothing made of breathable material, a hat with a brim, and sunglasses that block UV rays. These steps will guard your health and keep you cooler in the long run.

5. Eat right.

It’s natural to crave sugary drinks and icy treats in the summer heat but these foods will sap your energy as you digest them and leave you with a sugar crash. Choose healthy, energizing foods, like fresh fruit or low-sugar granola bars and stick to water as your drink of choice.

6. Allow for acclimatization.

If an employee is new or has been off work for a while, their bodies will need time to adjust to the summer’s heat. Start them with reduced time spent in high temperatures and increase it slowly. An acclimatized body will be able to better handle heat exposure and is less likely to suffer from heat stress.

7. Stay cool.

It’s important to allow your body to cool down after spending extensive time in the heat. Prepare air-conditioned break rooms and encourage your crew to spend time indoors after work to prevent the effects of heat stress.

8. Plan for the next day.

Your habits outside of work will also affect your ability to operate in the heat. Avoid overindulging on coffee or alcohol after-hours, as these will continue to have dehydrating effects on your body the next day.

9. Watch for symptoms.

Heat stress can progress quickly once it has begun and, if left untreated, can require time off work to recover from. Watch out for dizziness, nausea, headaches, cramps, elevated pulse, and if sweating stops. If you notice any of these symptoms, take a break in a cool area and drink lots of water. If a person becomes unresponsive, call 9-1-1 immediately.

10. Educate your crew.

While it’s important to pay attention to the health of your crew, it’s impossible to monitor everyone onsite at all times. Make sure your staff are trained to recognize the signs of heat stress and treat it immediately.

11. Know when to call it.

Some days are just too hot to work. It may be frustrating to end a workday early, but it will be more productive in the long run to preserve the health of your employees. There’s no legal cut off for when it’s too hot to work, so monitor the heat and your crew’s condition to make the wisest choice.

For more information on heat stress and how to prevent it, read WorkSafeBC’s free guide here.

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